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Baird named to congress of medical leaders

Katelin Baird was selected as a delegate to the Congress of Future Medical Leaders. CONTRIBUTED
Katelin Baird was selected as a delegate to the Congress of Future Medical Leaders. CONTRIBUTED

MADISON – Katelin Baird, a junior at James Clemens High School, has been selected as a delegate to the Congress of Future Medical Leaders.

The congress is an honors-only program for high school students who want to become physicians or enter medical research fields. The event’s intent is to honor, inspire, motivate and direct the top students in the country who aspire to be doctors or medical scientists.

The conference will meet in Lowell, Mass. on June 25-27.

“Katelin is one our fabulous Medical Academy students at James Clemens,” health science teacher Ashley H. Steinert said.

Baird was nominated by Dr. Robert Darling, who serves as Medical Director of the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists. Darling chose Baird to represent Alabama based on her academic record, leadership potential and determination to serve in the field of medicine.

During the three-day congress, Baird will join students from across the country and hear Nobel Laureates and National Medal of Science winners talk about leading medical research. Delegates will receive advice from deans of Ivy League and top medical schools on what to expect in medical school.

In addition, Baird and her peers will hear first-person eyewitness stories of patients who are living medical miracles. They will learn about cutting-edge advances and the future in medicine and medical technology.

“This is a crucial time in America when we need more doctors and medical scientists who are even better prepared for a future that is changing exponentially,” Richard Rossi said. Rossi is Executive Director of the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists.

“Focused, bright and determined students like Katelin Baird are our future. Katelin deserves all the mentoring and guidance that we can give her,” Rossi said.

Based in Washington D.C., the academy also has offices in Boston and is a nonpartisan, taxpaying institution to help address the crisis in nurturing future doctors and encourages and mentors students who want to devote their lives to medicine.

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