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Snowflakes comfort both Sandy Hook, Bob Jones students

Bob Jones artists created snowflakes of all colors and shapes for Sandy Hook students. (PHOTO: LAUREN ASKINS)
Bob Jones artists created snowflakes of all colors and shapes for Sandy Hook students. (PHOTO: LAUREN ASKINS)

Student artists at Bob Jones High School joined peers across America to create a symbol of comfort for the children of Newton, Conn.Saddened by the mass murder of elementary children, students in art I and II classes designed and shipped snowflakes for students at Sandy Hook Elementary School.

“Art can be a great outlet for your emotions,” art teacher Jennifer Norton said. “Sometimes, it is hard to express how you feel verbally, but making art or writing can be the best outlet.”

Before winter break, Bob Jones Principal Robby Parker forwarded an email to the student body about ideas to help students at Sandy Hook Elementary. Norton saw the snowflake idea and “thought it would be easy and fun to do. They wanted people to make beautiful snowflakes so that they could hang them throughout the school to create a winter wonderland for the students.”

About 90 students in Norton’s art classes made around 200 snowflakes. She mailed the snowflakes directly to the Connecticut school.

To create their designs, students used computer paper and watercolor as their media. “They could either leave their snowflake white, or watercolor the paper before, let it dry and then cut out the snowflake,” Norton said.

Norton believes making of the snowflakes helped the Bob Jones teenagers. “They knew they were doing something out of the kindness of their heart,” she said. “Even though they will never meet or see the faces of the children of Sandy Hook, they knew this would make them happy and bring them joy.”

In addition, the pay-it-forward act engendered pride for the students as they cut and colored the designs. “This was for a good cause. Students should practice doing good deeds for others, because it helps build their character and shows that they have empathy,” Norton said.

Due to overwhelming response, Sandy Hook teachers are not taking any more snowflakes but have expressed their appreciation for individuals who contributed, like the Madison teenagers.

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