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James Clemens Brain Expo shows body’s network

James Clemens families listen to child development students during the 2015 Brain Health Expo. (CONTRIBUTED)
James Clemens families listen to child development students during the 2015 Brain Health Expo. (CONTRIBUTED)

MADISON – The brain’s multitude of ‘firing’ impulses and its support from cell networks were explained at the Brain Health Expo at James Clemens High School.

Students designed posters, displays and walk-through exhibits of various brain parts to educate viewers about the brain and better ways to take care of it, event coordinator Leah McRae said. McRae teaches courses in science and Biomedical Academy.

Fourth-graders from several Madison campuses took a field trip to observe the Brain Expo. The event’s slogan was “Never Stop Learning.”

“This array of exhibits, posters and models — including a brain model you can literally walk through — taught how the brain works and ways we can better take care of through nutrition, stress management, brain stimulation and concussion prevention,” public relations manager John Peck said.

One poster recommended developing a new talent or skill to ‘jolt’ the brain into action.

Another group examined size and function of various body cells, like microglial cells that remove waste from the central nervous system and astrocytes that help with metabolism and regulate concentration of important elements, like potassium.

In a student-produced video, one James Clemens student stated that taking care of the brain is important because of needs for correct nutrients and fuels.

Art teacher Mason Overcash said, “Art works with the brain because it makes me more creative and make me attempt problem solving in different ways. Over the years, that has helped me think ‘out of the box’ and have creative approaches to solutions.”

Band Director Keith Anderson said, “When I listen to music it’s an artistic expression and an intellectual exercise.”

“Being involved in music allows me to appreciate the artistic expression and enjoy the emotion aspect but also the intellect and the process of composition that helps the listener arrive at an emotional response,” Anderson said.

James Clemens language students said that learning a foreign language causes several processes in the brain to ‘fire.’

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