Ad Spot

Heritage fifth-graders graduate ‘Too Good for Drugs’

Fifth-grader Christian Brooks pledged never to drink or smoke. Maddie Barnes discovered “tobacco products can rot out your teeth.” Christian and Maddie are two of 120 graduates of “Too Good for Drugs” at Heritage Elementary School.

Officer Ed Sasan congraulates "Too Good for Drugs" graduates, from left, Mary Caton Davidson, Sarah Bryan, Charlotte Bigelow, Maddie Barnes and Carsen Clift. The girls were dressed for Wacky Day at Heritage. (Photo courtesy of Lindsay Shelton)

Officer Edward Sasan with Madison Police Department presided at graduation on Oct. 26. Sasan serves as Heritage’s school resource officer.

Too Good for Drugs taught fifth-graders about goal setting, decision making, communication, peer pressure refusal and awareness of tobacco, alcohol and drugs, Sasan said.

In presenting the program, Sasan had a two-fold role. “I’m an educator/police officer to let them know that their choices have consequences. Two, I’m a mentor to every child.”

“I tell them my past experiences and how I overcame adversity. Drug prevention comes down to letting children have basic knowledge of what marijuana and prescription pills are. Both are the gateway to more dangerous drugs,” Sasan said.

The most important point for parents is allowing their children to talk about anything. “Children are more educated (about) drugs due to technology,” he said. Peer pressure is a major factor because “they believe in their friends. Children don’t like being out of the group.” With the program, parents are proactive, giving children a better understanding of substances.

Graduation coincidentally occurred with Red Ribbon Week. “The timing was perfect,” lead teacher Lindsay Shelton said about completing the six-week program.

Fifth-grader Charlotte Bigelow said she “learned many important things that will help for the future. People are going to pressure you into taking drugs. You should always, no matter what, say no to drugs.” Alanna Pendergrass learned negative effects of drugs and alcohol.

The program was “a fantastic way to learn about things you might not learn without Officer Sasan,” Colin Beyersdorf said. Carsen Clift described the program as “awesome. I learned what drugs I should not do and what choices to make.”

Mary Caton Davidson learned “how bad drugs can hurt your body … how it can kill you and stuff. Most importantly, I learned I’m too good for drugs.”

Madison

Playground revamps underway for Madison elementaries

Madison

Large turnout expected for All-Girls State Chess Championship

Business

Goldfish Swim School opens in Madison, plans to host free Community Family Swim Event Feb. 3

Madison

Mill Creek Robo-Crew take Breakthrough Award at UAH

Liberty Middle School

Liberty Lionettes awarded in hip-hop, pom at regionals

Bob Jones High School

American Legion Baseball organizing for new season

Discovery Middle School

Gifted Specialists fill broad needs of 20% of students

Madison

Mill Creek Greenpower Team motors to first place in Oxford

James Clemens High School

James Clemens Competition Cheer Team takes fourth state title

Madison

The celebration continues: Madison Street Festival awards grants to 16 Madison educational programs

Events

The Loomis Brothers Circus returns this weekend

James Clemens High School

Wyche earns full-tuition scholarship from Cameron Education Foundation

Madison

ReadyFest returns to underscore need for preparedness

Madison

Winter Knights Chess Tournament sets record attendance

Harvest

Delta Sigma Theta plans exciting evening with ROUGE – A Go Red Event

Events

Burritt on the Mountain to host Shane Adkins for Coffeehouse Concert series

Bob Jones High School

Sponsors essential to achieving Madison Street Festival’s traditions

Madison

Registration opens to vie for seat in pre-kindergarten

Huntsville

Former doctor from Madison sued for overdose death

James Clemens High School

Donaldson piloting James Clemens as Acting Principal

Madison

Discovery of woman’s body in Hazel Green leads to investigation of possible murder-suicide

Huntsville

Rookie Rally Chess Tournament returns to Blossomwood

Huntsville

Arts Huntsville awards $280,000 in grants to area arts organizations

Bob Jones High School

Nichols’ podcast reflects on MCS’ 25th anniversary

x