Ad Spot

UA offers safety tips for viewing eclipse

MADISON – For the first time in 99 years, a total solar eclipse will move from coast to coast across the continental United States Aug. 21, and all of North America will experience a partial eclipse.

Astronomers at the University of Alabama urge people to view the phases of the eclipse safely by not looking directly at the sun. Although the state of Alabama will not be under a total solar eclipse, an opportunity to view a partial solar eclipse will be available.

“The sun light is just as dangerous during an eclipse as any other day, but we tend not to want to look directly at the sun normally” Dr. William C. Keel said. Keel works as a professor of physics and astronomy at UA.

Alabama, though, will be in a partial eclipse with ranges from 80 percent of the sun covered by the moon near Mobile to 98 percent coverage in the northeast corner of the state, Keel said.

The best way to view the partial solar eclipse over Alabama that day are pinhole projections, solar filters and projections from telescopes or binoculars, Keel said.

With pinhole projection, sunlight passes through a small hole and makes an image of the sun on whatever surface used as a screen. A puncture in cardboard or aluminum foil works well, but any material works, and even gaps in tree leaves can project the eclipse onto the ground, he said.

Solar filters are thin films in a cardboard or plastic mount. Only special-purpose solar filters, such as eclipse glasses or handheld solar viewers, are sufficient to look at the sun.

Using projections through lenses, most telescopes and binoculars can focus enough to project a sharp image of the sun onto a sheet behind the eyepiece. Telescopes with eyepieces at a 90-degree angle from the tube offer easy ways to shade the image for clearer views, Keel said.

A partial eclipse will look like the moon is taking a bite out of the sun,” he said.

For more information, visit ua.edu/news/news-media.

 

Bob Jones High School

Exploravision regional win goes to James Clemens

Bob Jones High School

Alabama State Games To Offer Academic Scholarships During Opening Ceremony

James Clemens High School

James Clemens shows its tech savvy in Science Olympiad

James Clemens High School

James Clemens Jets Press rates first at All American High School Film Festival

Digital Version

Digital version of The Madison Record – April 7, 2021

Bob Jones High School

Sam Uchitel at Bob Jones founds business for Madison CEO

Madison

City Chess Blitz Championship to decide victor on April 24

Bob Jones High School

Senior boys can apply for Alabama Boys State

Madison

VBC says scams targeting ticket seekers increasing, explains how to avoid them

Madison

State open records bill clears Senate committee

Madison

‘Essential business’ bill goes to governor

Madison

EDITORIAL: Fighting COVID-19 will require personal responsibility when mask mandate expires

Madison

Huntsville Ballet Company is back with Peter and the Wolf – April 16-18

Madison

Hubert Family Farms finding success with area’s first “pick your own tulip” experience

Madison

Community tips lead police to Harvest man accused of sexual abuse of a child

Madison

State Senate bill could send over $3.2 million to Madison City Schools

Madison

State health officials ‘encouraged’ by improving COVID-19 numbers

Madison

Digital version of The Madison Record – March 31, 2021

Madison

Tornado relief supply drive continues at Liberty, Madison County District 2 office

Madison

Groundbreaking held for new middle school in Madison

Madison

Kory Alfred reaches credentials as Certified Parks and Recreation Executive

Bob Jones High School

Emily Lee at Bob Jones places at Poetry Out Loud state meet

James Clemens High School

James Clemens HOSA blasts gold at state conference

Bob Jones High School

American Legion Auxiliary accepting bids for Alabama Girls State

x