Studio offers new worship path, times and venue

Studio incorporates conversation and contemplative practices, instead of traditional elements of worship, like sermons and music. (CONTRIBUTED)
Studio incorporates conversation and contemplative practices, instead of traditional elements of worship, like sermons and music. (CONTRIBUTED)

HUNTSVILLE – In recent weeks, Studio has opened as a new spiritual community that doesn’t worry about staying within traditional parameters.

“We’re not a typical group that pulls attendees from local neighborhoods. We feel that what we do makes us more of a regional, rather than neighborhood entity,” spokesperson Lisa Wolfe said.

Studio’s intended audience “is folks who don’t like traditional worship, for whatever reason. We feel that Studio is unique in the way that we do things,” Wolfe said.

“Nearly 80 percent of people do not attend church on Sunday morning. Many of these people consider themselves spiritual, but not religious,” Wolfe said. These individuals may dislike a sit-in-a-pew service or have been hurt by church members in the past.

Studio is deliberately different. Instead of Sunday morning, the group meets monthly on Thursday evenings. Studio first met at a local residence and now meets in new space on the second floor of Lincoln Mill on Meridian Street.

“Rather than traditional elements of worship, like sermons and music, Studio incorporates conversation and contemplative (or awareness) practices,” Wolfe said. Studio’s motto is “No sermons — just conversation. No judgment — just acceptance. Awareness — not just information.”

Studio strives for everyone to feel accepted and “creates a safe space for all kinds of questions and differing opinions,” Wolfe said. “The group uses dialog rules to ensure thoughts are heard in an accepting environment. No one is allowed to enforce their opinions on the group.”

Becky Warren, Studio’s spiritual community director, facilitates conversations. Participation in discussions is voluntary, but generally the group is quite interactive.

“Everyone has life experiences and a story to tell,” Studio participant Nancy Carter said. “We get together and tell our stories and learn from each other.”

Studio engages in “centering prayer, in which participants open their hearts to God,” Wolfe said. Other contemplative practices include praying the scriptures and art contemplation.

The relaxed envrionment “feels like a bunch of friends getting together at someone’s house to talk,” Wolfe said.

For more information, visit Facebook/Studiohuntsville.

 

 

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