Ad Spot

Rosette disease still affecting Madison

According to Liz Cuneo, president of the Madison Beautification Board, there is still no cure for Rose Rosette Disease.

Many of Madison’s residents may look around their gardens or city property and wonder why some of the ‘Knock Out’ roses look funny.

They may notice that the stems and leaves have a bunched, distorted appearance. There may also be many, many more thorns, giving it a bristle brush look.

They may note that the new-growth, bright burgundy leaves are not turning green and may appear to be stunted or much thinner.  Blooms may look smaller or discolored, and may fall off without opening.  Eventually they notice that the plant is dying.  If this is the case, the roses they are seeing may have contracted Rose Rosette Disease (RRD).

According to Liz Cuneo, president of the Madison Beautification Board, there is still no cure for Rose Rosette Disease.  It is caused by a tiny mite called an eriophyid.  It feeds on the roses, and then travels on the wind to other roses, thus spreading the disease.  As the disease is systemic, once the rose is infected, it is virtually impossible to treat.  This is what is happening to the roses in Madison and all of North Alabama.

Once the rose has been diagnosed with the disease, the only solution is removal.  It is hoped that removal, which in effect thins out the roses, will slow down or stop the spread of the disease by making it harder for the mites to travel.

It is important to remember that if you remove a diseased plant, you remove it completely, to include the roots.  It should be bagged and sealed before placing by the curb for trash pick-up.

It is believed that the rapid spread of the disease here in North Alabama is due to the large numbers of the ‘Knock Out’ which have been planted.  While the ‘Knock Out’ rose is disease resistant, no plant is disease proof.  As in any landscape, diversity is best.

As RRD affects all roses, not just the ‘Knock Out’, it is recommended that a few precautions be taken when planting new roses.  Make sure not to plant a new ‘Knock Out’ where one has been removed.

You must wait before replanting in the same place.  You can, however, plant a different type of plant where a ‘Knock Out’ has been removed as this disease only affects roses.  It is recommended that you plant your new ‘Knock Out’ on six foot centers.

Roses should not touch.  One of the problems the Beautification Board has noticed is that roses planted too close together, producing the beautiful massed effect we see around town, is a bridge for the disease-carrying mites to travel from plant to plant.

Cuneo suggests that if residents believe their roses have the disease or want more information, they should contact Ken Creel, Madison County Extension Agent at (256) 532-1578 or (256)382-1554. Residents may also find more information and pictures in a comprehensive article from the University of Virginia at Pubs.ext.vt.edu/450/450-620/450-620.html.

James Clemens High School

James Clemens Theatre claims awards at state Trumbauer festival

Madison

City council green-lights $11 million bid to turn old Three Springs complex into community center

Madison

Young artists can submit artwork that will be launched into space

Events

Toyota Field to host Artemis I splashdown party on Sunday

Bob Jones High School

Bob Jones to represent Alabama at Southeastern Theatre Conference

Business

The State Of The Rocket City Trash Pandas 2022

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Rocket City Marathon 2022: New Format, New Course, New Day

James Clemens High School

Christmas Card Lane brightens downtown streets

Liberty Middle School

World War II, Korea veteran Walt Siffringer accepts Quilt of Valor

Bob Jones High School

beEntrepreneurial [beE] High School Idea Competition sets Dec. 7 deadline

Madison

School board approves bid to turn the old West Madison campus into PreK Center

Bob Jones High School

Greenpower racing builds STEM skills and confidence

Madison

Madison Animal Rescue Foundation in need of new foster homes

Madison

How to submit your child’s “Letter to Santa”

Events

Neighbors: Community theater groups in Decatur to stage ‘ELF: The Musical’

Events

Driving Nights for Galaxy of Lights begin today at Huntsville Botanical Garden

Events

Polar Express Christmas Tree Trail lighting and Wassail Fest being held Friday in downtown Madison

Polar Express Christmas Tree Trail lighting and Wassail Fest being held Friday in downtown Madison

Bob Jones High School

Former Patriot named assistant director of coaching at North Alabama SC

Former Patriot named assistant director of coaching at North Alabama SC

Digital Version

Check out the new issue of Madison Living Magazine

James Clemens High School

James Clemens medical and drama students, first responders simulate trauma scene

Madison

Curbside recycling recovery assistance throughout the weekend

Bob Jones High School

Scholarships at stake in American Legion oratorical contest

Bob Jones High School

Nichols’ podcast avers multi-disciplines feed theatre

Business

Town Madison becomes city’s first Arts & Entertainment District

x