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Security tightened

By Staff
Access limited to parts of city hall
Thomas Tingle
Record Managing Editor
Security measures at Madison Municipal Complex will tighten this year.
The plan will include limited access to non-public-oriented offices within the building, along with the placement of security doors that will lock after hours.
While those measures are implemented, Mayor Jan Wells said it will be done gradually and she believes it will not inconvenience the general public who use the facility.
"Anytime you mention the word security, especially the words tightened security, it makes many people feel uncomfortable about using a public facility like the Madison Municipal Complex," Wells said. "We are planning to implement several security measures in the building on a gradual basis and I don't believe that these measures will inconvenience those who use this building daily and after hours."
Among the measures to be implemented is a new reception desk in the lobby where three, part-time employees will greet and direct visitors to the desired department in the building. Visitors will sign in when entering the building before being directed to another area for business purposes.
"We'd like to know who is in the building – not necessarily to know his personal business – but to enable us to account for everyone in the event of a security or safety related incident," Wells said. "We have a lot of groups who use the building after normal business hours. That won't change, but access to some areas of the building after normal business hours will be restricted."
Last year, a glass door was installed in the main level hallway leading from the lobby to the clerk's office, mayor's office, and city attorney's offices. The mayor said she believes the locking mechanism on that door will be activated after business hours later this year.
"The Madison Municipal Complex is a public facility and we have already implemented several measures to create a more customer-friendly atmosphere," Wells said. "That isn't going to change at all, but you never know when an unfortunate situation could happen and we're trying to take the steps necessary to make the building safe and convenient, not only for the public, but for those who work here as well."

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